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cuts to go back to the clinton era rates for the wealthiest americans. maybe that means finding a really creative tax reform that eliminates deductions almost entirely for the wealthy. these are possible see teas. it's hard for me to imagine that either side is really hoping to go over the cliff at this point because they both know what it means for the economy and they are both worried about making that responsibility. at this point it doesn't make any sense to suggest that you're the one who is going to blink because that's going to put you sort of in the underposition of the negotiations. >> let me switch subjects completely because this is sort of the provocative headline. new york city mayor bloomberg called hillary clinton and said you should be my successor as mayor. how do you think that conversation went? i think being a mayor of new york city gives you an opportunity to imagine things that are possible but not in real life. i can imagine how hillary clinton would be enticed to take on that smaller stage after her staging as the nation and the world for the last decade.
in the silly analyses of what happened after quick contact states. clinton drastically lowered the capital gains tax and that was where most of the new revenues came. but in general, 50 nations around the world have reduced their tax rates since wealth and poverty was published. drastically reduce tax rates. most of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset,
clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to really communicate with strategic effect. and i think you touched, steve, on a very important piece which was a seniority complex and if i can put it that way. china has felt that they were abused by major powers to the 19th century and well into the 20 century, and that has an interesting counterbalance, which is a seemed a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions that they are building on how china images as a global power. the disconten
that will make very clear to us to assad, which if he crosses what secretary clinton called the red line and uses these weapons, chemical and biological, there will be grave consequences. essentially the end of his regime. i hope through the deterrence we can stop him from doing so, but i also believe that we as leaders of the world, the united states, has to begin to assemble an international coalition to prevent assad from using the chemical and biological agents against his own people. we have sat too long on the sidelines we are now getting engaged the need for engagement and more than that urgent action is clear and now. and i think we are all saying to president obama who has now stated very clearly there will be drastic consequences for assad and his government if they use weapons of mass destruction. we are with you. there is strong support across congress if the president takes the strong action that's necessary to prevent a very, very historically horrific humanitarian disaster in syria. senator. >> thank you, senator. we do represent a broad range of views from within the senate, the r
the increasing power and ubiquity of the islamic revolutionary guard corps and hillary clinton, a couple of years ago, said that iran was edging closer to being a military dictatorship. when marina talks about the long history of abuse of political prisoners, wonder whether the agents of that abuse have changed over these 20-30 years and whether the increased role of the irgc has an impact on the human rights landscape. has the power of the military and i ran things worse? >> thank you very much ladies and gentlemen and thanks for arranging this panel discussion about human rights. it is rather interesting that in this city, washington, d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. there's almost nothing about human rights. this sends a terrible signal to the iranian public. it means that you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear-armed state but what happens in iran does not really matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and the initiative to make
to the clinton era rates is, we're going to do -- >> you might not get the benefit if you don't do anything to the deficit you're talking ten times the revenue if you go below the 98%. you can't return to clinton prosperity only raising taxes on 2%. it's different for all taxpayers. am i right? >> you're almost entirely wrong. >> why would raising just on the 2% get us back to the clinton prosperity you're talking about? we can't return to the spending levels either. >> getting to a sound fiscal position is necessary to protect the economy. if we don't do that, as this economy recovers, that recovery is going to be aborted and that's going to do damage. then the question is how you get there, and the president believes that we should raise revenues with a tax system that has been proven in the past to go along with very substantial -- >> you can't conflate the two. you have the entire -- >> joe, joe, if you go back to this, i'm not sure what you're arguing. >> raising on 2% is different than the other structure. >> the reason it's different is that the tax rate on everybody else is going to
in addressing the political and security problems in northern mali. secretary clinton was in algeria to discuss mali among other issues approximately a month ago. the third challenge in mali is terrorism. we are gravely concerned about the presence and activities of terrorists and extremist groups in northern mali. al qaeda in the islamic ma grag, the movement for unity and jihad in west africa known as mujoa, and other affiliated groups have exploited the political unrest created by the march coup and the northern rebel ynt to expand their safe havens in northern mali and to impose their ideology on local communities throughout the northern part of the country. while these tactics remain alien to the vast majority of the population and the affected areas, aqim has established at least temporary relationships with a number of groups in northern mali and currently control the key cities of timbuktu, gal, and kid al. any attempt to militarily ouset a qim must be african led. it must be malian led. it must be well planned, well organized and well resourced to be successful. military plans must als
problems. we firmly believe in this. i find it interesting that secretary clinton's last visit to the continent she expanded on that and said, yes, african solutions to african challenges but we need african solutions ss and participation in global challenges as well and that's a recognition of the evolving nature of things in africa. there are two documents that broadly guide what we do in africa, and those, i would commend -- probably most of you have probably read them. the first is the presidential policy directive for subsaharaan africa, and it is based on four pillars. the first, to promote opportunity and development. secondly. to spur economic growth, trade and investment. thirdly, to advance peace and security. and fourth, to strengthen democratic institutions. insurprisingly, we at u.s. a africa command focus on the third, building peace and security. but as a necessary precondition to achieving the other four objectives. so, again, i think it's best to think of us in, again, a supporting and enabling role. the second document that guide our principles as the defense
these generalities. they'll close loopholes. it's a simple question, as president clinton said, of arithmetic. arithmetic. you can't get from here to there unless you raise the rates. >> so guys, that's where we are as of this morning, and now what everyone's waiting for is which side will make a concrete proposal here that actually includes some concessions? back to you. >> joining us from washington, d.c., jake sherman, congressional reporter for politico. who is going to make some honest concessions first? >> what eamon said is absolutely right. this comes down to one thing, whether republicans are willing to raise marginal income tax rates on americans. they're saying they're willing to raise revenue, but president obama has one criteria in this debate and that's raising income rates on all americans. right now, the sides are in their two corners on this and nobody is moving. so we're really only a couple weeks out and there's this huge gap, and eamon was right in another aspect. there is this brush fire of conservative lawmakers who don't want to raise revenue at all. so this is a huge p
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
-- a return. it is similar to what the former clinton chief of staff -- separate from that commission, he testified before the super committee last year and put forward his own proposal to try to break the impasse at that time. republicans say their current offer is not in that proposal, so it is not the simpsons-bowles plan that has gotten a lot of talk over the last few years, but it is modeled on a proposal from a leading democrat during these discussions, so they are hoping it will give some credibility going forward. the $800 billion they are offering is not the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. -- is the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates the same as well. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> you can read his proposal online by going to c-span.org and clicking to the lake. oklahoma congressman tom cole discusses the fiscal cliff negotiations and agrees with suggestions they should join president obama to extend the tax rates for the highest income earners the law professor john buckley looks at the history of the tax, plu
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11